millionsmillions:

Beginning today and lasting to the end of the summer, the New Yorker website is free — and includes its complete archive. Our humble suggestions of where to begin your reading frenzy.

Note to self: begin frenzy.

millionsmillions:

Beginning today and lasting to the end of the summer, the New Yorker website is free — and includes its complete archive. Our humble suggestions of where to begin your reading frenzy.

Note to self: begin frenzy.

Every day is a masterpiece, even if it crushes you.
Simon Van Booy, The Illusion of Separateness (on sale in paperback 7/29)

And some are overlooked.

(via unabridgedbookstore)

paulftompkins:

This was quite a journey! I spent the better part of a day going back and forth with a guy that I was not entirely sure was for real at first, then I absolutely got fooled, and then I realized I got fooled. It was fun. The guy said some LEGITIMATELY funny stuff when he was “in character.” And it all ended in a way that I felt good about.

It’s pretty much all laid out in the screencaps, But let me elaborate here:

HEY YOUNG MEN! I know it seems like women complain a lot about how they are represented in media, including fiction, and how it seems like they want entertainment tailored specifically to them, and how they seem to want ALL of pop culture to be politically correct or feminist-ized or whatever it is you think they want, but really, what’s happening is that women are tired of seeing garbage women characters in most of our entertainment. And they’re wondering, Would it really be so much trouble to make more realized female characters? You could still have all your CGI and action and science fiction and drama and swords and stuff, but the female characters could be a little more fleshed out and interesting. And the entertainment would still be good and would, in fact, be better.

Guys, instead of  thinking, “Hey, not everything has to be politicized,” try thinking, “I wonder what it would be like for me if the situation were reversed, and how I’d feel if in the vast majority of the entertainment I consumed, the male characters were few and far between and then mostly used as talking props & plot devices. I wonder if I’d get kinda tired of that and occasionally I’d say something, even a little joke, just to ease the annoyance a little.”

Fellows. Listen to the women in your lives. Ask them questions. It will change your perspective for the better. Years ago, I got into a brief argument with two female friends of mine about a movie— it does not even matter which movie— that they viewed as sexist and I did not. I couldn;t even fathom how they could see it that way. I tried to argue that it was not sexist. In recounting our discussion to another party, it was pointed out to me that they might have a different viewpoint based on their life experiences, and that it was not for me to tell them that their interpretation was incorrect. And that I was probably getting defensive about it because if the movie was sexist, it followed that my liking it would make me appear sexist. And that’s when I realized that none of this was about me, and maybe I should shut up and listen and try to understand. And also to be more aware of things like this and develop not just my sympathy, but my empathy.

I will only ever be able to empathize so much with women, because my experience as a white male in America is vastly different from that of anyone who is not that. But I can relate to:

  • not being taken seriously
  • not being listened to
  • being dismissed
  • being condescended to
  • having something explained to me that I already understand

And I having had those experiences, I am now more inclined to TRY to understand where someone is coming from if they are telling me they are having a similar experience with our culture.

So guys: just try. You don’t even really have to dig that deep. Think about your own experiences as a person, then apply that to someone else. It gets easier the more you do it, and it makes your life better.

Anyway, I hear Dawn of The Planet of The Apes is pretty good! 

theartofgooglebooks:

Employee’s distorted fingers over fore-edge with tabs.
Throughout Spiritus Creator Incubus by Michael Beck and Johann Conrad Heinrich (1687). Original from the Bavarian State Library. Digitized May 17, 2011.

theartofgooglebooks:

Employee’s distorted fingers over fore-edge with tabs.

Throughout Spiritus Creator Incubus by Michael Beck and Johann Conrad Heinrich (1687). Original from the Bavarian State Library. Digitized May 17, 2011.

Thomas the tank SOCIALIST?!

Thomas the tank SOCIALIST?!

Curtis’s rig is so clunky but he’s so smooth.

liartownusa:

Country Recess Children’s Whiskey… Since 1889

liartownusa:

Country Recess Children’s Whiskey… Since 1889

atlasobscura:

Xylotheks: Wondrous Wooden Books That Hold Wooden Collections

xylothek (from the Greek for tree, xylon, and storing place, theke) is an object where the container is a fundamental component of the contents. The term usually refers to books that are both made of wood and filled with wood specimens. Xylotheks (also spelled xylotheques) first began appearing at the end of the 17th century in cabinets of curiosity. As time progressed, they grew larger and more systematic, with hundreds of individual volumes in a single collection, and are now consulted by those working in forestry, botany, forensics, art restoration, and other fields.

Xylotheks were particularly popular in late 18th century and early 19th century Germany. In these constructions, each book in the xylothek was made out of a particular type of wood, the spine covered with the corresponding bark and decorated with associated moss and lichens. Once opened, the book would reveal samples of dried leaves, flowers, seedlings, roots, and branches, with a special compartment in the spine holding a written description of the species’ biology and use. The Special Collections department of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences library in Alnarp, Sweden, contains a beautiful example of this type of xylothek, made in Nürnberg, Germany, at the start of the 19th century. Similar xylotheks are also found in France, Austria, Italy, and the Czech Republic.

For even more on the rich history of Xylotheks, keep reading on Atlas Obscura…

(via unabridgedbookstore)

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Mammal Monday, Cougar. Other names include mountain lion, puma, panther, painter, mountain cat. Its range, from the Canadian Yukon to the southern Andes of South America.
© The Field Museum, CSZ75923.
Progress of taxidermy specimens of Cougars (mountain lions) for diorama. Female and cub on white sheet on table in prep lab.
8x10 negative

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Mammal Monday, Cougar. Other names include mountain lion, puma, panther, painter, mountain cat. Its range, from the Canadian Yukon to the southern Andes of South America.

© The Field Museum, CSZ75923.

Progress of taxidermy specimens of Cougars (mountain lions) for diorama. Female and cub on white sheet on table in prep lab.

8x10 negative

I’ve got my three bookmarks in place. The Summer of Jest begins.

I’ve got my three bookmarks in place. The Summer of Jest begins.

A broad knowledge creates precise inspirations

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